Infinitely More

From Dragon Boat we left towards RedLine Contemporary Art Studios and Yoyo Ma. Infinitely More, was hosted by RedLine as a representative of RiNO and Five Points - neighborhoods where the arts and homelessness intersect. Resident RedLine artist Sammy Lee’s street art cart and IMBY served as the focal points of the gathering. From the deck of IMBY Mr. Ma played the Johannes Sebastian Bach’s unaccompanied Cello suite no. 1. Later he provided a chilling improvisational melody on his cello as Esther Hernandez and Sammy Lee moved about the crowd as an interactive art display portraying the unseen cost of consumerism. Also accompanying the performances was a discussion on what constitutes a home. Mr. Ma spoke of music as a home. He feels as though when he is playing a piece he steps into a world of those that came and played before him. Every bright note and carrying tone is a breath expelled over the dust and cobwebs classical music has accumulated in the popular visage. He brings new life to a space with old pieces like a family builds a home from storied relationships. Whether it is music, where the family is, roommates, or just a place of uncommon comfort – the home whatever it looks like, is a crucial aspect of one’s humanity.

 Yoyo Ma as he activated IMBY.

Yoyo Ma as he activated IMBY.

The Dragon Boat Festival

Untried and untested we set out on the road to the Dragon Boat festival at Sloan’s Lake with a tiny home in tow and whole lot of lemonade. There, as a peculiarity amongst the dragon boats and food trucks our tiny home sat silhouetted by the water front. Seeing it there in one piece, having endured I-25 and few potholed roads, was a comforting sight for eyes that had looked upon its naked frame not a week earlier and claimed, “Dragon Boat might be a long shot!” But, we made it – more than that, with the help of Deborah Yang, we created a refuge on the water front. Guests to IMBY were welcomed out of the elements into a place that provided momentary shelter to encounter a permanent solution for someone’s homelessness. As people were welcomed into the space they also encountered an occupant. Deborah Yang activated the space and engaged visitors in discussion about places of rest. For those experiencing homelessness the prevalence of camping bans and newly erected barriers has radically shifted the ways in which people find places of rest. Deborah was a temporary resident of the home, but her amicable presence begs guests to see the tiny home movement in a much more intimate way. A tiny home is more than the sum of its trendy yellow door and dropout deck – it is a refuge for those who seek the care unto which only a home can provide at a fraction of the cost.

 Robin Gallite the RedLine Deputy Director and Artist Deborah Jang.

Robin Gallite the RedLine Deputy Director and Artist Deborah Jang.